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More than 8,400 SA ‘Tweens’ share what matters to them most

The Blame Game is the latest report released by Commissioner Helen Connolly examining the findings from her School Exclusions project in which 400 South Australian children and young people and their families, shared their views on the impact of education exclusion. The report examines the perspectives of these children and their families and found that they differ significantly from those of teachers and schools with students often perceiving exclusion, including suspensions, expulsions and being excluded from a classroom, as a form of punishment for situations that are often exacerbated by factors that are beyond their own control. 

Read the full media release here.
Download the report
here

 

Commissioner Opens Space to Dream ‘Design Thinking’ Challenge Exhibition at MOD

Commissioner for Children and Young People, Helen Connolly, today announced the opening of an exhibition at MOD. showcasing the top-rated entries for her inaugural Space to Dream ‘Design Thinking’ Challenge in which she challenged South Australian children and young people to use design thinking to create a toy or gadget for someone their age who is ‘moving to Mars’.

The challenge was devised to inspire the next generation of space entrepreneurs and innovators – it also speaks to teachers, parents and the broader SA community about the possibilities the space industry offers SA children and young people in careers of the future.

Space to Dream helps young South Australians draw a direct link between the Australian Space Agency, now based at Lot Fourteen in Adelaide, and their potential to be part of the industry it steers. Potential that offers them career opportunities encompassing innovation, design, and technology, to name just a few of the areas in which ‘dream jobs’ are likely to be created within the space industry of the future. 

A total of 36 Space to Dream 3D models and drawn designs will be on display at MOD from now until Saturday 28 November

Read the full media release here 

Commissioner calls for SA leaders to advocate for FREE sanitary products

What do Queensland, Scotland and New Zealand have in common?

Women leaders who have advocated for the introduction of free sanitary products for their citizens. Commissioner for Children and Young People, Helen Connolly is calling upon women leaders in South Australia’s Parliament to get in step with their female counterparts at the state, national and international levels, and work together to introduce free sanitary products into schools, colleges and universities throughout the State before the end of this COVID-19 year.

Commissioner Connolly points to New Zealand Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern; Member of the Scottish Parliament, Monica Lennon; and Queensland Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, who have all recognised that to address the issue of gender inequality, girls and young women must have access to essential sanitary items, regardless of whether they can afford to buy them or not.

Read the full media release here

It’s time to look through the eyes of the child to see what they say makes an organisation child safe

On the 30th anniversary of National Child Protection Week (6 – 12 September, 2020) Commissioner Helen Connolly has released ‘Trust is a Must’ – what does it take to be child friendly and child safe?’
The Commissioner’s latest report examines findings from an online survey of more than 260 South Australian children and young people, the majority of whom were between 12 and 17 years of age (94%) in which the Commissioner asked what they think it takes to be child safe. Children and young people told the Commissioner they want adults to set-up up processes that create a cycle of continuous feedback. They will begin to believe adults are taking them seriously when their complaints, issues and concerns are acted upon in ways children and young people have suggested will work best; not based on assumptions adults have made about a child or young person’s life or situation

Read the full media release here
Download a copy of the report here

 

 

Play critical to teenage health and wellbeing new report finds

Commissioner Connolly has today released a new report titled ‘Press Play’. The report examines the findings of a survey of 500 South Australian young people aged 13 – 18 on the importance of play in their lives. While much research focuses on the importance of play for young children, rarely is the importance of play for teenagers examined. Press Play identifies what activities young people define as play, as well as what barriers prevent them from participating in more play. These include having too much homework and not nearly enough ‘play’ time embedded into delivery of their school learning agenda. Governments, civic society and business all have an obligation to build the youth-friendly infrastructure young people need in order to fulfil their need and right to play. The report contains recommendations from young people themselves, on how to embed playfulness into their lives to foster creativity and critical thinking.

Read the full media release here
Download a copy of the report here

 

 

Young People not the face of the pandemic but maybe the eyes and ears

Commissioner for Children and Young People Helen Connolly has today released Reflections on COVID-19 in which in their own words, South Australian young people reflect on the impact of the coronavirus on their world and their futures. More than 300 young people contributed their reflections through conversations, focus groups and a journaling project which explored their experiences of feeling hopeless and helpless; the impact on their identity and opportunities; on their participation and motivation; relationships and connection; and what it has meant in relation to accessing services and increasing inequality. 

To download a copy of the full media release click HERE

 

 

Young people and families ask for new approach to careers education and work experience

Commissioner Connolly has today released a suite of reports examining careers education for South Australian school students. The reports are the culmination of a two-year in-depth examination into what young people need to successfully transition from school into the world of work. The major report in the series – Off to Work We Go examines what young South Australian school students (aged 12 – 18 years) recommend be done to improve their prospects of being future work-ready, while two companion reports – Spotlight on Parent/Carer Careers Advice and Spotlight on Work Experience, cover the perspectives of parents and carers, business owners and operators, and school careers educators and advisors. 

To download a copy of the full media release click HERE

 

 

Esports and gaming essential to building 21st century communities that young people will want to live in will

Commissioner Connolly has chosen Youth Week to launch her latest report – Community Building in the 21st Century which examines how collaborative gaming can be deployed as a youth engagement strategy to build the kind of communities young people want. Supporting grassroots development of collaborative gaming and esports clubs in local community settings requires a fundamental shift in our thinking around the potential the new sport offers. What is required is an understanding that gaming and esports is a healthy, fun activity that builds resilience, communication, teamwork and self-discipline. It can also provide pathways to positive outcomes for individuals and communities in the same way traditional sports clubs do. Also like community sporting clubs, at the core of collaborative gaming is community spirit, having fun, improving skill development and achieving recognition. Esports and gaming also offers future employment opportunities, not just for professional players, but for game developers, sound engineers, broadcasters, commentators, referees and competition organisers and promoters, to name a few of the roles this burgeoning industry is creating.

To download a copy of the full media release click HERE

 

 

Commissioner launches new space for SA’s young people – hub.ccyp.com.au

rainbow hub logo

Young people living in South Australia have a new place to visit. It’s called hub and it’s been created by the Commissioner for Children and Young People to enable her to continue a critical dialogue with South Australia’s young people around the things that matter to them most. hub is a place for young people to ‘visit, hang out, keep up to date, have a say, and connect’ with other young South Australians. It’s also a place that invites them to join the conversation – to contribute their ideas, get creative and to help make South Australia a great place for young people to live. If you have young South Australians in your life who you think might be interested in being a youth rep for their corner of South Australia, you should definitely tell them to visit hub today!

To download a copy of the full media release click HERE

 

 

The voice of experience – the young people asking for change in SA’s Youth Justice system

Young people aged 14 – 21 years, all with a lived experience of South Australia’s youth justice system, have recommended eight key changes to significantly improve the system from their point of view. The recommendations form part of Making Change in Youth Justice – A User’s Guide to building a better South Australian youth justice system, launched today by South Australia’s Commissioner for Children and Young People, Helen Connolly. They include addressing cell hygiene, reducing court waiting times, supplying easy to understand information about the people and procedures young people will face, and arrangement of the courtroom to be less intimidating. They say implementing these changes would go a long way to achieving better outcomes for young people in the State’s Youth Justice system. 

The young people’s recommendations include addressing cell hygiene, reducing court waiting times, supplying easy to understand information about the people and procedures young
people will face, and arrangement of the courtroom to be less intimidating. They say implementing these changes would go a long way to achieving better outcomes for young people in the State’s youth justice system.

To download a copy of the full media release click HERE

 

 

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